Show Reports – The Next Best Thing to Being There

Ron Guth

Posted on September 15, 2016 by No Comments

I hate missing coin shows. They’re where all the buzz is. They’re where a lot of my friends are. They’re good barometers of the market. They’re like visiting scores or hundreds of coin shops in a single weekend. If I miss a show, I feel like I’m out of the loop. Thus, after the show is over, I immediately call up friends who I knew were at the show and ask them all about it. Or, thanks to the Internet, you can learn a lot about the show from Show Reports.

Show Reports are personal experiences as related by actual participants at the show.

For instance, I recently posted a “2016 ANA Diary” on the PCGS Blog sharing my experiences at the August 2016 American Numismatic Associations convention in Anaheim, California. Much of my time was spent in meetings, promoting PCGS CoinFacts, sharing information about coins, or answering questions at the PCGS Booth. My experience was much different from the dealers who were doing actual business on the bourse floor. So, even though I was at the show myself, I was curious to see the perspectives offered by other people. Several dealers post Show Reports, which are available to anyone with a computer (including you), so here’s what I found.

One of my favorite Show Reports is the one offered by John Agre at Coin Rarities Online . John specializes in high-end U.S. colonial coins and he is a very active buyer and seller. Plus, he tells great stories. I’ll let you read through his eight(!) days of entries to see what he had to say about the show.

Next up is Charmy Harker’s Show Report. Charmy is known in the industry as “The Penny Lady” for her penchant for Flying Eagle, Indian Head, and Lincoln Cents. Her Show Reports are among the most popular posts on the PCGS Message Boards. They are usually loaded with images from start to finish, including after-hour festivities (and great wines). For her take on the 2016 ANA show, click here.

Another great Show Reporter is Laura Sperber of Legend Numismatics, who posted Pre-, Actual-, and Post-ANA Reports. Laura’s Market Reports and Hot Topics are always exciting and they come from the standpoint of one of the leaders in the coin market.

Dave Wnuck, a former partner of the afore-mentioned John Agre, and now operating under Dave Wnuck Numismatics, LLC doesn’t report on shows per se, but he does issue an entertaining “Making The Grade” newsletter that often touches on his experiences at coin conventions. You can read archives of his newsletters here.

Numerous other people post show reports on the PCGS Message Boards and elsewhere. Combine that with the trade publications and press releases from the big auction houses, and you almost don’t have to go to shows anymore.

Okay…that may be stretching it a bit.

If you have a favorite show report, please post a link to it in the Comments section.

Even better, visit the next coin show and post your own Report!

Filed Under: News

2016 ANA DIARY

Ron Guth

Posted on August 18, 2016 by 1 Comment

One of the most eagerly-anticipated coin shows of the year is the annual convention of the American Numismatic Association. This year (August 2016), the show was held at the Anaheim Convention Center, literally just across the street from Disneyland in Anaheim,. California. Everyone’s experience at this major show differs – this is my take on this major show.

Tuesday, August 9
I live in San Diego, about 90 miles south of Anaheim, so I left mid-morning, drove up to PCGS headquarters in Irvine, ran through some job-related tasks, then had lunch with Jaime Hernandez, a fellow PCGS colleague and the guy who knows as much about modern coins and their pricing as anyone. After lunch, I headed up to the Anaheim Hilton, parked the car, checked in, then headed over to the show, where setup was well under way. Most of the afternoon was spent glad-handing and talking about PCGS CoinFacts. It was great to reconnect with many old friends. After the show, I pretty much went into hermit mode and spent much of the evening reading “Mindset,” a great book by Carol Dweck that I recommend highly.

Wednesday, August 10
This was the first day of a series of annual meetings held by specialized collector clubs. First up was the John Reich Collectors Society at 8 a.m. David Finkelstein, a phenomenal researcher of early U.S. Mint history gave a terrific presentation where he tied the first deposit of silver coins at the Philadelphia Mint to the French government and a local French merchant. I suspect that more will come of this as David digs deeper. At 10:15 a.m., R. Lee Barrett gave a great talk about the history of female sculptors in America, including Laura Gardin Fraser, one of my favorites. At 11:30 a.m. Oliver Hoover presented a detailed overview of the portraits of Cleopatra on ancient coins (did you know there were more than seven Egyptian queens named Cleopatra?). After lunch, I spent some time at the PCGS table working on narratives for PCGS CoinFacts and talking with people who walked up to the table with questions. At 3 p.m., the Society of Beard Numismatists (S.O.B.’s) held their annual meeting in a designated area on the bourse floor. There I met up with P. Scott Rubin, who has written many CoinFacts narratives for us in the past. As the show wound down, I headed to the Heritage Platinum Night session, where they were auctioning off some really cool Colonial rarities. Back in the day, the auction room would have been filled; nowadays attendance is sparse because many bidders from all over the world participate in the auction over the Internet.

Thursday, August 11
Thursday started off at 9 a.m. with a presentation by Rick Snow of a new way to describe coins and to recognize and reward above-average quality coins. Rick was one of the first dealers to sticker coins; his Eagle Eye stickers are often seen on Flying Eagle and Indian Head Cents.

At 10 a.m. I participated as a panelist in the Numismatic Literary Guild symposium with Scott Travers, Donn Pearlman, Charles Morgan, and surprise guest David Ganz (former ANA president). We discussed collector education and consumer protection in the coin industry. The audience was sparse, but we had some great questions and conversations. At 11 a.m., I hustled over to the Whitman Publishing table to sign copies of “The 100 Greatest Women” book. Unfortunately, few people showed up and no one purchased a book. Around noontime, I had lunch with Steve Sloan, Director of Marketing for Collectors Universe, at one of the food trucks parked outside of the convention center. Beginning in the late afternoon, the activities were non-stop. At 4:00 p.m., my wife and I attended the ANA Awards banquet, where I received the Heath Literary Award (Second Place) for my article, “The 100 Greatest Women on Coins” in the ANA’s publication, “The Numismatist.” At 5:30 p.m., the Smithsonian Institution hosted a cocktail reception, where curator Ellen Feingold laid out some visions for the future. Jennifer Gloede, one of Ellen’s assistants, presented a “Spot The Counterfeit” game in which participants were asked to categorize fakes, copies, and real coins. This is a proposed, hands-on experience that will be rolled out in the future at the museum. It’s a fun, educational experience, and I’m happy to report that yours truly got it right on the first try. At 6:30 p.m., my wife and I dashed over to Ruth’s Chris for the annual meeting of the U.S. Rare Gold Coin Collectors Club. This is a group of collectors and dealers who play with the crème-de-la-crème of American numismatics. Unfortunately, we had to leave before the keynote speaker, Greg Rohan of Heritage, gave his talk, but we’re looking forward to seeing it on video. The reason for our early departure was the annual meeting of the Numismatic Literary Guild, an event known more popularly as the NLG Bash. This is the equivalent of the movie industry’s Oscar night, where hundreds of awards are given out to authors and researchers. Our own Don Willis received the Best Software award to PCGS’s mobile apps, and I won an Extraordinary Merit award for “The 100 Greatest Women on Coins” and the Best Internet Blog award for a series of posts entitled “The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now?” on the PCGS Blog. The NLG Bash is a raucous, somewhat irreverent affair, always a lot of fun, and always offering good food and camaraderie.

1844 DollarOne of the highlights of the Bruce Morelan Collection of Seated Liberty Silver Dollars

Friday, August 12
My wife and I started the day at the hotel breakfast buffet. The line at the Starbucks in the hotel lobby was out the door and around the corner. Waiting in line for 30 minutes for a cup of coffee is not my cup of tea (hey, that’s funny). At 9:00 a.m., I attended the annual meeting of the Early American Copper Club, an association of Half Cent and Large Cent collectors. I’ve been a member of this club since the mid-1970’s, and it was great to see some old friends. We had a lively discussion of PCGS versus EAC grading. Regardless of which side you’re on, it’s interesting to note that most collectors have their coins slabbed just before they sell them. Just sayin’. At 10 a.m. it was time for the first Meet The Expert session, where people can bring their coins up to the PCGS table for grading opinions and questions. We meet some great people this way, and we get to see some nice (and not-so-nice) coins. At 11:30 a.m., it was time for the PCGS Set Registry Luncheon. For many years, BJ Searls and her staff have done a tremendous job of running this event, which is a highlight of the show for many collectors. Mark Stephenson did a great job of emceeing the luncheon for the first time. Kevin Lipton inducted John Albanese into the PCGS CoinFacts Dealer Hall of Fame, and Q. David Bowers did the same for Augustus B. Sage, one of the first coin dealers in America and a founder of the American Numismatic Society. After the luncheon, it was back to the PCGS table for more customer and dealer interactions, and a pleasant hour or so poring over Bruce Morelan’s fabulous collection of Seated Liberty Silver Dollars. The big event of Friday evening was the ANA banquet, where friend John Kraljevich received the Numismatist of the Year honors and exhibitors received a spate of awards. This night is always the capstone of the show and a great way to end on a positive note.

Chi HoChi Ho, a former Collectors Universe employee, came by with his Boy Scout troop to say hello

Saturday, August 13
Final day of the show. Every Saturday at the ANA convention, the Rittenhouse Society meets for their annual breakfast. This group is comprised of authors, researchers, and numismatists who have made their mark in some significant fashion. I’ve been a member for many years and, for me, this breakfast is one of the high points of the convention. Whitman Publishing kindly funds the breakfast, Q. David Bowers emcees, and the meeting is an opportunity to catch up on each member’s accomplishments over the previous year and any projects they might have in the works. This year, we inducted Ray Williams, a well-known colonial collector and past president of the Colonial Coin Collectors Club. Welcome Ray!

After breakfast, I wandered the floor and said goodbyes to several dealer friends. Many dealers, who had already been at the show for a week or more, had departed, leaving empty tables scattered about on the floor. The show was definitely winding down.

Charles Morgan of CoinWeek came by to take the PCGS grading test and review the results. I won’t reveal his score (he’s planning to do that in his own video), but to his credit, he was fairly “close to the line” – in other words, he was either right on and, when he was off, he was neither too high nor too low.

At 11:30 a.m., I sat down for the final Meet The Expert session. Only a few people showed up this time, but in one of those rare, surreal moments, a man walked up to the table with two coins: a $20 gold piece and a silver dollar which his father had bequeathed to him. The $20 was a common date worth around $1,300; the silver dollar was the rare 1893-S. Initially, the owner thought the large gold piece was the more valuable of the two coins, but when I explained that the 1893-S $1 was a nice AU55, possibly an AU58, and worth $40,000+, he was taken aback. He immediately submitted the coin and I am pleased to report that it came back as a PCGS AU58. Discoveries as significant as this are rare, but this is why we hold these events. One never knows what treasures are out there waiting to be uncovered.

Final note
The ANA is a blur of activity. Writing this post reminded me of the many wonderful experiences one can have throughout the week. If you love coins, make sure to add the annual ANA convention to your bucket list.

Filed Under: News

The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? – Part XI (Final)

Ron Guth

Posted on July 21, 2016 by No Comments

The Lord St. Oswald Large Cents – Final Installment

The Lord St. Oswald Collection contained 25 U.S. Large Cents, all dated 1794 except for a single, average-grade 1793 Chain Cent. The 1964 Christie’s sale offered 22 Large Cent; only three appeared in the 1992 sale. Fortunately for future researchers, the catalogers at Christie’s attributed all of the Large Cents by Sheldon variety numbers. Today, we know the whereabouts of most of the coins and their “modern” grades, all of which is revealed below. For purposes of brevity, the Lord St. Oswald Large Cents were presented in groups of five coins over five installments (please see previous blog posts). This is the final installment in this fascinating story.

226346Lot 165 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 71) – in mint state, die clashing as last

Analysis: This was one of three S-71s in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. The New York firm, Stack’s, purchased this lot for the equivalent of $1,736. Subsequently, the coin made the rounds of some great “name” collectors: Dr. E. Yale Clarke; Tom Morley; John W. Adams; Herman Halpern; R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr.; and finally Walter J. Husak. Both Noyes and Breen considered this coin to be the second finest example known of the variety; it currently resides in a PCGS MS64+BN holder in the High Desert Collection. Interestingly enough, Walter Husak owned TWO of the Lord St. Oswald S-71s – in 2001, he purchased the finest known example (see the next lot) from Mr. Naftzger, then sold this coin off as a duplicate.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:165, $1,736 (620 British Pounds) – Stack’s – Dr. E. Yale Clarke Collection – Stack’s 10/1975:43, $7,000 – Gordon J. Wrubel – Dr. Robert J. Shalowitz – Robert Emmer (Penn State Galleries) – Del Bland – Tom Morley – John W. Adams Collection – Tom Morley – New England Rare Coin Auctions 1/1981:20, $13,500 – Kevin Lipton – Herman Halpern Collection – Stack’s 3/1988:103, $26,400 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner, sold privately on 3/1992 – Denis W. Loring, sold privately on 4/22/1995 – Walter J. Husak Collection – High Desert Collection

1748Lot 166 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 71) – in mint state and red, die clashing as last two

Analysis: This lot was easily the finest of the three S-71s in the Lord St. Oswald sale. Baldwin & Sons purchased the coin for the equivalent of $2,940, presumably on behalf of Dorothy Paschal, the next owner. From there, it went into her friend, Dr. William Sheldon’s collection, where it stayed until he sold his Large Cents, en masse, to R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. In 1992, Naftzger sold his “entire” collection of early date Large Cents to Eric Streiner, but this coin was not a part of the deal. Instead, it went to Walter Husak in 2001 as an upgrade of the second finest example (see previous lot). In 2008, Heritage sold this coin as a PCGS MS65RB for $253,000.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:166, $2,940 (1,050 British Pounds) – A.H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – Dr. William H. Sheldon Collection, sold privately on 4/19/1972 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately in 2001 – Walter J. Husak Collection – Heritage 2/2008:2073 (as PCGS MS65RB 13470600), $253,000

Lot 281 U.S.A., Chain Cent, 1793, wide date head of Liberty right with flowing hair, rev. legend around chain reads AMERICA, no periods (Sh. 20) [editor’s note: this is actually an S-2], rubbed on the hair over Liberty’s ear, otherwise good very fine, rare

Analysis: In 1992, Christie’s sold “The Property of a Gentleman” held by the Nostell Priory. Though no mention was made of Lord St. Oswald, it was easy to deduce that they were from that source. Why they were not included in the 1964 sale is unknown.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie’s 2/1992:281, $18,375 – Alan Weinberg Collection

217882Lot 282 U.S.A. Liberty Cap Cent, 1794, bust of Liberty with “Amiable Face” right, rev. value in wreath (Sh. 30), rubbed on the high points, particularly Liberty’s hair above her ear and forehead, attractive problem-free surfaces, about uncirculated and rare thus

Analysis: By 1992, coin prices had advanced considerably over the nearly three decades since the 1964 sale. Lot 282, a choice Sheldon 30 sold for the equivalent of $13,895.64 — far more than any of the coins sold in 1964, including the Mint State 1794 Dollars. In 1995, Walter Husak purchased the coin for his expanding Large Cent collection, then sold it less than a decade later when he upgraded the variety. In its last appearance, this coin sold in 2013 as a PCGS MS62BN.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie’s 2/1992:282, $13,895.64 – Anthony Terranova, sold privately in 8/1995 – Walter J. Husak Collection, sold privately in 4/2004 – Paul Gerrie Collection – Goldbergs 2/2013:19 (as PCGS MS62BN), $23,000

112148Lot 283 U.S.A. Liberty Cap Cent, 1794, bust of Liberty right, rev. value in wreath (Sh. 57), rubbed on the high points, denticles flat where edge not fully struck up between 9 and 1 o’clock, good extremely fine and rare thus

Analysis: This was the fourth S-57 from the Lord St. Oswald Collection. Though it was not as nice as Lots 150 and 151 from the 1964 sale, it was still a substantial coin, and it was certainly better than Lot 152, a Very Fine example. This was another Husak coin, on its way to an upgrade, called NGC AU58 in 2003. Its most recent appearance was in the sale of the Dan Holmes collection, where it sold for $15,525 as a raw AU55.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie’s 2/1992:283, $8,421.60 – Eric Streiner – Superior Galleries 10/1992:69, $4,620 – Anthony Terranova – Chris Victor-McCawley, sold privately on 9/15/1997 – Walter J. Husak Collection – Superior 9/1998:1121, $7,762.50 – Superior 5/2003:380 (as NGC AU58), not sold – Chris Victor-McCawley & Anthony Terranova, sold privately on 1/9/2004 – Daniel W. Holmes Collection – Goldbergs 9/2009:92 (as Raw AU55), $15,525

There is one more coin that merits consideration. In 2004, Stack’s sold a 1794 S-31 Large Cent as lot 1056 with a pedigree to the 1964 sale of the Lord St. Oswald Collection (no lot number). This appears to be an incorrect citation, as there was no S-31s in either of the Christie’s sales.

This ends our discussion of the Lord St. Oswald coins. However, their travels are not over. They will move from collector to collector, from auction to auction, from one new steward to another, but we will continue to track them every time they reappear on the market. The Lord St. Oswald name will always be one of the most important pedigrees in numismatics.

Filed Under: News

The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? – Part X

Ron Guth

Posted on June 24, 2016 by 3 Comments

The Lord St. Oswald 1794 Large Cents – Installment Four of Five

The Lord St. Oswald Collection contained 25 U.S. Large Cents, all dated 1794 except for a single, average-grade 1793 Chain Cent. The 1964 Christie’s sale offered 22 Large Cents; only three appeared in the 1992 sale. Fortunately for future researchers, the catalogers at Christie’s attributed all of the Large Cents by Sheldon variety numbers. Today, we know the whereabouts of most of the coins and their “modern” grades, all of which is revealed below. For purposes of brevity, the Lord St. Oswald Large Cents will be presented in groups of five coins over five installments; this is the fourth installment of the five.

 

Lot 160 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 69) – in mint state with much original colour”

Analysis: This was one of three S-69’s in the Lord St. Oswald sale. The coin is a gorgeous, glossy brown color, with ample traces of original mint red (so much, in fact, that when it sold as part of the Husak collection in 2008, the catalogers expressed their opinion that it should have been graded Red-Brown). This particular example is listed as Finest Known by both Noyes and Breen/Bland. At the 1964 sale, Spink and Son of London purchased the coin for the equivalent of $8,400. Shortly thereafter, it entered into the collection of Dorothy Paschal, then went to her collecting compatriot, Dr. William H. Sheldon, then to mega-collector Ted Naftzger. This coin appears not to have been a part of the big deal Naftzger sold to Eric Streiner in 1992; rather, it was sold privately to Walter Husak in 2001. In its last appearance in 2008, it sold for $109,250 as a PCGS MS65BN.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:160, $8,400 (3,000 British Pounds) – Spink & Son, Ltd., sold privately – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – Dr. William H. Sheldon Collection, sold privately on 4/19/1972 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately in 2001 – Walter J. Husak Collection – Heritage 2/2008:2071 (as PCGS MS65BN 13470598), $109,250

 

Lot 161 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 69) – condition similar to last”

Analysis: The second of three S-69’s in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. This piece has more red than the previous lot, but is not quite as glossy. As a result, the buyer, Lester Merkin, was able to snag it for considerably less than the preceding lot. He held the coin for the next 13, eventually selling it to Andy Hain (who is best known for his collection of New England and Massachusetts silver coins). Eventually, the coin found its way into Ted Naftzger’s collection. Both Noyes and Breen/Bland called it the second finest known. PCGS certified the piece as MS65RB (Red and Brown).

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:161, $2,296 (820 British Pounds) – Lester Merkin, sold privately on 10/29/1977 – Andrew M. Hain Collection – Dennis Steinmetz – Steve Ivy Numismatic Auctions 9/1980:942, $37,000 (Noyes says $41,700) – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner – Jay Parrino (The Mint)

 


92003 smallLot 162 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 69) – in mint state and red”

Analysis: This was the third of three S-69’s in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. Lester Merkin purchased this coin for the equivalent of $1,680, held it for just shy of four years, then sold it for almost twice what he paid for it. In subsequent years, it bounced around between auctions and collections, finally selling in a Stack’s auction in 2002. Currently, it resides in the Turissini Collection.  Both Noyes and Breen/Bland considered it to be the third finest example of the variety (as an MS63 Brown), but PCGS certified it as the finest of the three (as a PCGS MS65+RB).

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:162, $1,680 (600 British Pounds) – Stack’s – Lester Merkin 6/1968:102, $3,100 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection – New Netherlands 11/1973:390, $5,750 – Pine Tree 2/1975:649, $6,300 – Jerry A. Bobbe – Dr. Robert J. Shalowitz – Del Bland, sold privately on 1/4/1985 – Bertram Cohen Collection – Early American Numismatics 2/1985:532, $32,000 – Bertram Cohen Collection – Andrew M. Hain Collection – Stack’s 1/2002:733 (as Raw MS63), $36,800

 

314209 600x300Image courtesy of Ira & Larry Golderg Coins & Collectibles

Lot 163 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 70) – in mint state and partly red but split in striking”

Analysis: This was the only S-70 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. Noyes and Breen/Bland both considered it tied for Finest Known with one other example, that being the PCGS MS62BN example from the Dan Holmes collection. Unfortunately, the Lord St. Oswald S-70 has some minor tooling beneath IBE of LIBERTY, which limited PCGS’ grade to “UNC. Details, tooled.” The “split in striking” refers to the obverse die crack that runs from the rim, between the T and Y of LIBERTY, above Liberty’s eye and just into her cheekbone. Tom Reynolds was the last owner of record, and his collection (and this coin) were sold in 2016.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:163, $1,120 (400 British Pounds) – A.H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Lester Merkin 10/1066:98, $2,100 – Lester Merkin 6/1971:648, $1,600 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection – Thomas D. Reynolds Collection – Goldbergs 1/2016:47 (as PCGS UNC. Details, tooled), $21,150

 

Lot 164 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 71) – extremely fine with some original colour and evidence of die clashing on obverse”

Analysis: This was the first of three S-71’s in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. With the benefit of hindsight, we can see that the order of the quality of the S-71’s in the sale was the opposite of the S-69’s, which started out with the best coin as the first lot. This example is listed as Third Finest by Noyes and Breen/Bland and is currently in a PCGS MS61BN holder, despite quite a bit of mint red color. Apparently, Walt Husak owned this piece for a short while until 2001, when he upgraded to the finest known S-71 – not surprisingly, also from the Lord St. Oswald Collection (see Lot 166). Tom Reynolds became the new owner of this coin, and he held it from 2001 until 2016.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:164, $560 (200 British Pounds) – A. H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Lester Merkin – C. Douglas Smith, sold privately in 1965 – Alfred Bonard Collection – Henry J. Berube (New England Coin Co.) – Alan Weinberg, sold privately in 2/1979 – Del Bland, sold privately on 5/13/1986 – Herman Halpern Collection, sold privately on 12/26/1986 – C. Douglas Smith Collection – Dr. Robert J. Shalowitz – Dr. Allen Bennett Collection – Goldbergs 2/2001:275 – Thomas D. Reynolds Collection (as PCGS MS61BN 32788976) – Goldbergs 1/2016:48 (as PCGS MS61BN), $58,750

Filed Under: News

The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? – Part IX

Ron Guth

Posted on May 26, 2016 by 1 Comment

The Lord St. Oswald 1794 Large Cents – Installment Three of Five

The Lord St. Oswald Collection contained twenty-five U.S. Large Cents, all dated 1794 except for a single, average-grade 1793 Chain Cent. The 1964 Christie’s sale offered twenty-two Large Cents; only three appeared in the 1992 sale. Fortunately for future researchers, the catalogers at Christie’s attributed all of the Large Cents by Sheldon variety numbers. Today, we know the whereabouts of most of the coins and their “modern” grades, all of which is revealed below. For purposes of brevity, the Lord St. Oswald Large Cents will be presented in groups of five coins over five installments; this is the third installment of the five.

204206

Lot 155 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 60) – in mint state with much original colour”

Analysis: This was the only Large Cent plated in the 1964 Christie’s sale, and it was the only Sheldon 60 in the entire collection. This remarkable coin is the undisputed finest example known of the variety. “Ted” Naftzger, a previous owner, called it “MS70,” indicating the high opinion in which he held this coin.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son – in – law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:155, $2,184 (780 British Pounds) – A.H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – Dr. William H. Sheldon Collection, sold privately on 4/19/1972 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner, sold privately in 3/1992 – Denis W. Loring, sold privately in 7/30/1993 – Thomas D. Reynolds Collection -Goldbergs 1/2016:37 (as PCGS MS64BN), $67,562.50

128608

Lot 156 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 61) – scratch in obverse field below chin, otherwise uncirculated with much original colour”
Analysis: Among all the U.S. coins in the Lord St. Oswald collection, this coin had one of the lowest grades. However, even in its current condition, it is considered to be third or fourth finest known (depending on the authority). Sheldon 61 has a Rarity Rating of R-4 (Very Scarce), thus demand from collectors is high. In 2008, this coin sold for more than thirty times what it sold for in 1964.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:156, $1,008 (360 British Pounds) – Stack’s – Frank H. Masters, Jr. Collection – RARCOA 5/1971:73, $3,200 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner – Chris Victor-McCawley – Dr. Thomas Turissini Collection – Walter J. Husak Collection – Heritage 2/2008:2063 (as ANACS MS60 details, scratched 4042671), $32,200

217903

Lot 157 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 67) – good very fine”

Analysis: This was the first of three examples of the Sheldon-67 variety in the Lord St. Oswald collection. Because of a small lamination flaw above the 9 of the date, and a scratch that extended up from the top of the defect, this would have been another high-grade Gem. At its 1964 selling price of $392, it was one of the more affordable Large Cents in the collection. However, it was vastly overshadowed by the next two lots.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:157, $392 (140 British Pounds) – A. H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Lester Merkin – Norweb Collection – Bowers & Merena 11/1988:2726 (as Raw AU58), $3,190 – J. R. Frankenfield Collection – Superior 2/2001:269 – Thomas D. Reynolds, sold privately in 6/2010 – Paul Gerrie Collection – Goldbergs 2/2013:40 (as PCGS Unc details, scratch), $16,675

72522

Lot 158 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 67) – in mint state and red”

Analysis: This was the finest of the three S-67’s in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. How nice was it? William Noyes called it finest known, as did Walter Breen (using Del Bland’s census), and PCGS called it MS67 Red-Brown. In two separate sales in 2008 and 2013, this coin flirted with the $500,000 mark each time. It is one of the more colorful 1794 Large Cents in existence.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:158, $2,184 (780 British Pounds) – A.H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – Dr. William H. Sheldon Collection, sold privately on 4/19/1972 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection – Walter J. Husak Collection – Heritage 2/2008:2069 (as PCGS MS67RB 13470596), $488,750 – Flambeau Collection – Joseph O’Connor – Cardinal Collection Educational Foundation – Stack’s/Bowers 1/2013:13005 (as PCGS MS67RB 13470596), $499,375

2162

Lot 159 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 67) – corrosion spot on obverse, otherwise in mint state and red”

Analysis: This was the third and final S-67 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. Like the preceding lot, this coin retained much of its original red color. Noyes and Breen considered this the second finest example known of the variety; PCGS called it MS64 Red-Brown. This coin last sold in 2009 for $184,000, giving an indication of how much the market values the difference of the three extra points of the preceding lot.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:159, $2,016 (720 British Pounds) – A.H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Lester Merkin 10/1973:255, $8,750 – Andrew M. Hain Collection – Dennis Steinmetz – Steve Ivy 9/1980:94, $29,000 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection – Paramount “Auction ‘86” 7/1986:1517, $20,900 – Stack’s, sold privately – Marvin Taichert Collection – Stack’s 5/2001:11, $36,800 – W.M. “Jack” Wadlington, sold privately via Bob Grellman and Chris Victor-McCawley on 6/30/2005 – Daniel W. Holmes, Jr. Collection – Goldbergs 9/2009:109 (as PCGS MS64RB), $184,000

Filed Under: News

The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? Part VIII

Ron Guth

Posted on April 1, 2016 by 1 Comment

The Lord St. Oswald 1794 Large Cents – Installment Two of Five

The Lord St. Oswald Collection contained twenty-five U.S. Large Cents, all dated 1794 except for a single, average-grade 1793 Chain Cent. The 1964 Christie’s sale offered twenty-two Large Cent; only three appeared in the 1992 sale. Fortunately for future researchers, the catalogers at Christie’s attributed all of the Large Cents by Sheldon variety numbers. Today, we know the whereabouts of most of the coins and their “modern” grades, all of which is revealed below. For purposes of brevity, the Lord St. Oswald Large Cents will be presented in groups of five coins over five installments; this is the second installment of the five.

Lot 150 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 57) – obverse: weakly struck but in mint state and red

Analysis: In 1964, the American firm of Stack’s purchased this coin and, from there, it wended its way through the collections of Dorothy Paschal, Dr. William Sheldon, and “Ted” Naftzger (a familiar course for many of America’s best Large Cents), then to Dr. Allen Bennett and Walt Husak. In his Condition Census, Bill Noyes listed this example and one other (Lot 151, see following) as tied for finest known honors. Walter Breen (using Del Bland’s data) recognized this example as the finest S-57 in existence. It is from a late state of the dies, which accounts for the “weakly struck” portion of the description in the 1964 Christie’s catalog, but the surfaces are superb and both sides feature ample amounts of original mint red color – a very rare finding on any Large Cents of this era.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:150, $2,100 (750 British Pounds) – Stack’s, sold privately – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – Dr. William H. Sheldon Collection, sold privately on 4/19/1972 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner – Jay Parrino (The Mint) – Superior 9/1997:38, $44,000 – Dr. Allen Bennett Collection, sold privately on 1/20/1998 – Walter J. Husak Collection – Heritage 2/2008:2059 (as PCGS MS65RB 13457922), $103,500

Lot 151 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 57) – condition similar to last

Analysis: The price history of this coin has been impressive. New York dealer Lester Merkin purchased this coin for approximately $1,820 at the 1964 Christie’s sale. When it reappeared at auction in 1971, it had nearly doubled in price. By 1973, the price had more than tripled. From 1973 to 2002, the coin traded hands rarely and privately, eventually selling for $35,650 in a January 2002 Stack’s sale. Finally, in February 2013, this coin sold for $189,750 or more than 100 times the original purchase price. Bill Noyes recognized this as one of the two finest examples of the variety (see the previous lot). Breen/Bland placed it at fourth finest known. The reverse has more mint red than any other S-57.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:151, $1,820 (650 British Pounds) – Lester Merkin – Stack’s – Frank H. Masters, Jr. Collection – RARCOA 5/1971:69, $3,250 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection – New Netherlands 11/1973:378, $6,000 – Del Bland – Dr. Robert J. Shaolwitz – Del Bland, sold privately on 1/4/1985 – Bertram Cohen Collection – Andrew M. Hain Collection – Stack’s 1/2002:732, $35,650 – Superior 6/2002:2437 – Chris Victor-McCawley, sold privately on 4/2003 – Paul Gerrie Collection – Goldbergs 2/2013:33 (as PCGS MS65BN), $189,750

Lot 152 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 57) – very fine

Analysis: The present whereabouts of this example is unknown, nor is it likely to ever appear. Its lower condition is incongruous with the other 1794 Large Cents in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. It was not significant enough to merit attention, so it likely melted into some collection where it sits unrecognized today.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:152, $672 (240 British Pounds) – Lester Merkin

Lot 153 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 59) – in mint state with much original colour

Analysis: This is the finest S-59 known to exist and it is the only Red & Brown survivor. Like many great Large Cents, it followed the Paschal-Sheldon-Naftzger route following the sale, after which it passed into the collections of Jack Wadlington, then the late Dan Holmes. In 2009, it sold at auction for $276,000. Both Noyes and Breen/Bland placed this coin in the number one spot in their respective Censuses.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:153, $1,736 (620 British Pounds) – A.H. Baldwin & Sons, Ltd. (London) – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – Dr. William H. Sheldon Collection, sold privately on 4/19/1972 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner – Jay Parrino (The Mint), sold privately on 4/16/1996 – W.M. “Jack” Wadlington Collection, sold privately via Bob Grellman and Chris Victor-McCawley on 11/7/2005 – Daniel W. Holmes, Jr. Collection – Goldbergs 9/2009:95 (as PCGS MS66RB), $276,000

Lot 154 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 59) – in mint state and red

Analysis: This was the second of only two S-59’s in the 1964 Christie’s sale. Lester Merkin purchased this coin for approximately $2,660 — significantly more than the preceding lot — thus one can assume that the condition and appearance are better, as well. Unfortunately, the last sighting of this coin predates the advent of third-party grading, so the “modern” grade is unknown at this point. However, in both the Noyes and Breen/Bland Censuses, this coin is listed as the second finest example known of the S-59 variety.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:154, $2,660 (950 British Pounds) – Lester Merkin – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – C. Douglas Smith Collection – Dr. Robert J. Shalowitz – Del Bland – Dr. Robert J. Shalowitz – David Berg – William Freeman – John W. Adams Collection – Bowers & Ruddy Fixed Price List 1982:54 (as Superb Choice Uncirculated, MS-65), $22,500 – Bertram Cohen Collection

Filed Under: News

The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? Part VII

Ron Guth

Posted on March 15, 2016 by No Comments

The Lord St. Oswald 1794 Large Cents – Installment One of Five

The Lord St. Oswald Collection contained twenty-five U.S. Large Cents, all dated 1794 except for a single, average-grade 1793 Chain Cent. The 1964 Christie’s sale offered twenty-two Large Cent; only three appeared in the 1992 sale. Fortunately for future researchers, the catalogers at Christie’s attributed all of the Large Cents by Sheldon variety numbers. Today, we know the whereabouts of most of the coins and their “modern” grades, all of which is revealed below. For purposes of brevity, the Lord St. Oswald Large Cents will be presented in groups of five coins over five installments.

Lot 145 “U.S.A. CENT, 1794 (Sheldon no. 40) – almost extremely Fine

See it here: http://www.pcgscoinfacts.com/CoinImages.aspx?s=35585

Analysis:
American collector/dealer, Edwin Shapiro purchased this lot for the equivalent of $868. Subsequently, several big-name Large Cent collectors have owned this coin over the years: C. Douglas Smith; R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr.; Herman Halpern; Walter J. Husak; and others. This example is listed as second finest known on the Noyes and Breen censuses; it is the finest example of the variety certified by PCGS. This was the only Sheldon 40 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:145, $868 (310 British Pounds) – Edwin Shapiro – C. Douglas Smith, sold privately in 1965 – Al Bonard – French’s, sold privately in 5/1967 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 12/11/1986 – Herman Halpern Collection – Stack’s 3/1988:52, $15,400 – Dr. Allen Bennett Collection, sold privately in 2000 – Walter J. Husak Collection, sold privately in 2000 – Dr. Tom Turissini Collection, sold privately in 4/2009 – Paul Gerrie Collection – Goldbergs 2/2013:25, $77,625 – subsequently graded PCGS MS64BN 26772769

Lot 146 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 42) – good very fine

Analysis: Edwin Shapiro kept his bidder paddle up and won this lot, too. C. Douglas Smith owned this coin at two different time in the 1960s and eventually sold it to variety specialist, Jules Reiver. It’s last auction appearance was in 2006, when it sold as an NGC AU58 for $34,500. This was the only Sheldon 42 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:146, $336 (120 British Pounds) – Edwin Shapiro – C. Douglas Smith Collection, sold privately in 1965 – Alfred Bonard Collection – C. Douglas Smith Collection, sold privately on 10/31/1968 – Jules Reiver Collection – Heritage 1/2006:19203 (as NGC AU58 1940087-008), $34,500

Lot 147 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 45) – in mint state and red

See it here: http://images.pcgs.com/CoinFacts/32189852_1452088_max.jpg

Analysis:
H. Van Colle purchased this coin at the 1964 Christie’s sale, after which it passed through the collections of Dorothy Paschal, Dr. William H. Sheldon (inventor of the 70-point grading system), Naftzger, Husak, and Dan Holmes. It is listed as the finest known example in both the Noyes and Breen censuses. This remarkable coin shows ample traces of original red color on both sides and it currently resides in a PCGS MS65RB holder. This was the onlt Sheldon 45 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. This was the only Sheldon 45 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:147, $2,800 (1,000 British Pounds) – H. Van Colle Collection – Dorothy I. Paschal Collection – Dr. William H. Sheldon Collection, sold privately on 4/19/1972 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr., sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner, sold privately on 4/4/1992 – Dr. Allen Bennett Collection, sold privately in 2001 – Walter J. Husak Collection – Heritage 2/2008:2047 (as PCGS MS65RB 13457910), $149,500 – Chris Victor-McCawley Fixed Price List #82 (Spring 2008), offered as PCGS MS65RB for $185,000, sold privately on 5/9/2008 – Daniel W. Holmes, Jr. Collection – Goldbergs 9/2009:74 (as PCGS MS65RB), $184,000

Lot 148 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 46) – almost in mint state and some original colour

See it here: http://images.pcgs.com/CoinFacts/26092869_29655710_max.jpg

Analysis: The American firm of Stack’s purchased this lot at the 1964 sale. Their fellow New Yorker, Anthony Terranova, sold the coin to mega-collector, “Ted” Naftzger, who eventually sold his collection intact in 1992 to Eric Streiner. Terranova had another opportunity to handle this coin when he sold it into the collection of Dr. Thomas Turissini. This example currently resides in a PCGS MS64RB holder and it is ranked number one in both the Noyes and the Breen Censuses. This was the only Sheldon 46 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection.

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:148, $1,064 (380 British Pounds) – Stack’s – Anthony Terranova, sold privately in 12/1964 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner – Anthony Terranova – Dr. Thomas Turissini Collection

Lot 149 “U.S.A. cent, 1794 (Sheldon no. 49) – almost in mint state and some original colour

See it here: http://images.pcgs.com/CoinFacts/26092871_33210354_max.jpg

Analysis: This was another great purchase by Stack’s, who sold it into the collection of Frank Masters. As with most high quality Large Cents, this one eventually went into “Ted” Naftzger’s collection, then through several hands until it joined Dr. Turissini’s other Large Cents. It currently resides in a PCGS MS65RB holder. Both sides show a nice balance of original color. This was the only Sheldon 49 in the Lord St. Oswald Collection

Complete pedigree:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:149, $1,400 (500 British Pounds) – Stack’s – Frank H. Masters, Jr. Collection – RARCOA 5/1971:65, $2,900 – R.E. “Ted” Naftzger, Jr. Collection, sold privately on 2/23/1992 – Eric Streiner – Jay Parrino (The Mint) – Tom Morley – Superior 1/1994:782, $29,700 – Anthony Terranova, Thomas D. Reynolds, and Chris Victor-McCawley – Dr. Thomas Turissini Collection

Filed Under: News

The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? – Part VI

Ron Guth

Posted on January 11, 2016 by No Comments

The Lord St. Oswald 1795 Half Dollars

The catalog for Christie’s 1964 sale of the Lord St. Oswald Collection contained three 1795 Half Dollars, including a gem example of the 1795 Two Leaves variety, a Mint State “Small Head”, and a third coin that remains unaccounted for today. No Half Dollars were included in the 1992 sale.

Lot 142 “U.S.A., HALF-DOLLAR, 1795, reverse: two leaves under each wing of eagle – extremely fine and rare.”

Lester Merkin purchased this coin for £250 (or the contemporary equivalent of $700). The present whereabouts of this coin is unknown but, fortunately, this coin was plated in the 1964 catalog (the only one of the three to merit a photograph) and it is easily identified as a 1795 Overton-116. The image does not match any of the pictures in our archive, but there are enough distinctive points on the coin that it would be easy to identify it if (and when) it appears on the market in the future.

The complete pedigree of this coin reads as follows:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:142, $700 (250 British Pounds) – Lester Merkin – present whereabouts unknown

Lot 143 “U.S.A., HALF-DOLLAR, 1795, a similar coin, long vertical die flaw on obverse – in mint state and rare.”

This lot has been subsequently identified as a 1795 Overton-112 – the so-called “Recut Date” variety (or 1795/1795). The London firm of Spink & Son purchased this lot for $1,400. Later, it appeared in a Lester Merkin auction, from where it went into the collection of mega-collector Reed Hawn. The last public appearance of this coin was in 1995, when it sold in a February Heritage auction. In recent years, this coin has been pedigreed to the Stellar collection and it is currently in a PCGS MS65 holder. This was easily the best 1795 Half Dollar in the Lord St. Oswald Collection. A high quality image of this coin can be seen at http://images.pcgs.com/CoinFacts/28528010_max.jpg

The complete pedigree of this coin reads as follows:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:143, $1,400 (500 British Pounds) – Spink & Son, Ltd. – Lester Merkin 2/1971:589, $1,400 – Reed Hawn Collection – Stack’s 8/1973:2 – Brit Simons, sold privately in 1975 – Heritage 2/1995:5654 (as NGC MS65), $92,400 – Stellar Collection – subsequently graded PCGS MS65 28528010

Lot 144 “U.S.A., HALF-DOLLAR, 1795, a similar coins, obverse: somewhat scratched, otherwise in mint state though shows cabinet friction.”

This lot has been subsequently identified as a “Small Head” Overton 126a and it is the only Mint State example known of this variety. Spink & Son, Ltd. purchased the coin for $840. At some point, the coin made its way into the collections of Reed Hawn and Dr. George Oviedo. In 1999, the Pogue family purchased the coin at auction and held onto it until May 2015, when it sold at auction for just shy of $200,000, more than double the 1999 purchase price. Currently, it resides in a PCGS MS62 holder. This is the only Mint State “Small Head” Half Dollar – of any variety – certified by PCGS. A high quality image of this coin can be seen at http://images.pcgs.com/CoinFacts/05639009_max.jpg

The complete pedigree of this coin reads as follows:
William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:144, $840 (300 British Pounds) – Spink & Son, Ltd. – Reed Hawn Collection – Stack’s 8/1973:3 – Dr. George F. Oviedo Collection – Stack’s 9/1983:722 – William R. Orwen Collection – Stack’s 10/1999:341 (as Raw Choice Brilliant Uncirculated), $89,125 (plate-matched to the following) – D. Brent Pogue Collection – Stack’s/Bowers & Sotheby’s 5/2015:1099 (as PCGS MS62 05639009), $199,750

Next installment – the Lord St. Oswald 1794 Large Cents

Filed Under: News

The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? – Part V

Ron Guth

Posted on December 15, 2015 by No Comments

The Lord St. Oswald 1794 Half Cents

The catalog for Christie’s 1964 sale of the Lord St. Oswald Collection contained no U.S. Half Cents. However, the 1992 catalog included two 1794 Half Cents, both of exceptional quality. They appear to have been overlooked in 1964, as they certainly deserved to be in the earlier sale, where they would have fit in nicely with the other coins there.

Both of the Lord St. Oswald 1794 Half Cents were of the Cohen 9 variety, which is one of the High Relief Head types. The “rubbing” described in the 1992 catalog for both lots (see below) is a slight change in color on the very highest points on the obverse. This is typical of the High Relief Head and is more a function of strike than wear.

Lot 284 “U.S.A., Liberty Cap Half-cent, 1794, head of Liberty right, rev. value in wreath, slightly rubbed on the highest points but Uncirculated and with some original mint lustre, very rare thus.”

Eric Streiner purchased this coin directly from the 1992 sale and it was sold through Jay Parrino into the Foxfire Collection, which, in turn, was sold intact to the Pogue family.  The coin has remained in their possession ever since. Recently, PCGS graded this coin MS66 Red-Brown and it is slated to appear as Lot 3005 in the Stack’s/Bowers February 2016 auction of the D. Brent Pogue Collection.  A high quality image of this coin can be seen at http://images.pcgs.com/CoinFacts/32157244_max.jpg)

This is arguably the finest known example of the Cohen 9 variety. The surfaces of this coin appear to be completely original in terms of preservation and color. Jim McGuigan’s PCGS MS66 Brown example is slightly glossier in appearance but it has less red color than the Lord St. Oswald piece. The next best example is the PCGS MS65 Red-Brown example from the Missouri Cabinet (sold for $402,500 in 2014).

William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie’s 2/1992:284 (as Raw Uncirculated, slightly rubbed on the high points), $68,904 – Eric Streiner – Jay Parrino (The Mint), sold privately in 8/1995 – Foxfire Collection (Claude E. Davis, MD), sold privately (as an entire collection) on 10/5/2004 – Brent Pogue Collection (as PCGS MS66RB 32157244)

Lot 285 “U.S.A., Liberty Cap Half-cent, 1794, head of Liberty right, rev. value in wreath, small patch of verdigris on wreath on reverse, rubbed on the high points but uncirculated and with some original mint lustre, very rare thus.”

The present whereabouts of this coin is unknown. The coin is easily identified by the presence of a small localized area of darker color on the upper right reverse edge between the F of OF and the first A of AMERICA. It has not appeared in any major auction or collection since the 1992 sale.

William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie’s 2/1992:285 (as Raw Uncirculated, rubbed on the high points), $45,936

Next installment – the Lord St. Oswald 1795 Half Dollars.

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The Lord St. Oswald Coins – Where Are They Now? – Part IV

Ron Guth

Posted on December 1, 2015 by 2 Comments

The Lord St. Oswald 1795 Silver Dollars

The 1964 Christie’s catalog of the Lord St. Oswald Collection contained three remarkable 1795 Silver Dollars, as follows:

Lot 139 “U.S.A., DOLLAR, 1795 (Bolender no. 2) – planchet marks on both sides and some scratching in obverse field, otherwise in brilliant mint state, very rare.”

Lot 139 sold for 460 British Pounds (the contemporary equivalent of $1,288) to the American firm of Stack’s, where it joined Norman Stack’s personal collection. In 1989, Mr. Stack sold the coin through Eric Streiner. In its most recent appearance, Stack’s/Bowers sold the coin in a 2014 auction in an NGC SP64 holder. The full pedigree includes only four auction appearances since the 1964 Christie’s sale:

William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:139 (as Raw Mint State), $1,288 (460 British Pounds) – Norman Stack, sold privately through Eric Streiner in 1989 – Superior 8/1991:553 – Bob Bisanz U.S. Type Set Collection – Heritage 1/2001:7186 – Heritage 1/2007:1025 (as NGC MS64PL 1848399-003), $161,000 (no mention was made of the prior pedigree in the Heritage catalog) – Stack’s/Bowers 8/2014:13114 (as NGC SP64 3722004-018), not sold, though a post-sale press release reported a sale price of $822,500

Lot 140 “U.S.A., DOLLAR, 1795 (Bolender no. 2) – a similar coin, planchet marks on both sides, some scratching on face and in field on obverse, otherwise in mint state, very rare.”

This was a duplicate of the preceding lot, but it sold for nearly double the price. This example was purchased by Mrs. Alfred Ostheimer for 900 British Pounds (the contemporary equivalent of $2,520). To our knowledge, this coin has not reappeared on the market since 1964.

Lot 141 “U.S.A., DOLLAR, 1795 (Bolender no. 7) – in mint state, a rare [sic] variety than last two.”

In fact, the Bolender 7, Bowers-Borckardt 18 variety is no rarer than the Bolender 2, Bowers-Borckardt 20 variety, but this was a special coin because it is the finest “Silver Plug” Dollar known (though it is doubtful if that meant anything in 1964 because the significance of the silver plugs remained undiscovered until years later). Today, we know that silver plugs were inserted into the center of underweight silver dollar and half dollar planchets to bring them up to the proper weight. This coin exhibits both the silver plug AND adjustment marks, which were scratches caused when a file was used to remove silver and bring the coin down to proper weight.

The London firm of Spink & Son purchased Lot 141 for 700 British Pounds (the contemporary equivalent of $1,960). In its most recent appearance, this coin sold as part of the D. Brent Pogue Collection in September 2015 as a PCGS MS65+. The full pedigree includes a stint in the fabulous collection of type coins built by former Congressman “Jimmy” Hayes:

William Strickland Collection – Charles Winn (husband of Priscilla Strickland, son-in-law and cousin of William Strickland), Rowland Winn, 1st Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Winn, 2nd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland George Winn, 3rd Baron St. Oswald of Nostell – Rowland Denys Guy Winn, Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. – Christie, Manson, and Woods 10/1964:141 (as Raw Mint State), $1,960 (700 British Pounds) – Spink & Son, Ltd. – Lester Merkin 10/1973:451 – Dr. Herbert Ketterman, sold privately – James A. “Jimmy” Hayes Collection – Stack’s 4/1983:1220 – RARCOA, sold privately in 9/1987 – D. Brent Pogue Collection (as PCGS MS65+ 31529965) – Stack’s/Bowers & Sotheby’s 9/2015:2043 (as PCGS MS65+ 31529965), $705,000

Next installment – the Lord St. Oswald 1794 Half Cents.

Filed Under: News

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