Archive for February, 2018

REVISITING THE DR. JOHN E. WILKISON COLLECTION OF GOLD U.S. PATTERNS, Part IV

Posted on February 14, 2018 by No Comments

In this installment, we’ll explore the 1860’s-dated gold patterns owned by Dr. Wilkison.  Include in this list are: 1960 $5 Judd 271; 1865 $20 Judd 452, and 1868 $10 Judd 661.

18268

1860 $5 Gold Pattern, Judd 271, Pollock 319, Gold, Reeded Edge
PCGS PR64+DCAM 31672893

Judd 271 is unusual in that the diameter is the same as a $10 gold piece, but to keep the weight the same as a regular $5 gold piece, the planchet was rolled out much thinner than normal.  Another unusual aspect of Judd 271 is that the V in FIVE is actually an inverted A.  Judd 271 is represented by only two examples, both of which (amazingly, but not surprsingly) were once owned by Dr. Wilkison.  The good doctor acquired his first example in the early 1940’s from Abe Kosoff for $4,200. In 1962, Dr. Wilkison traded for Dr. Judd’s collection of gold patterns, which included a second (and better) Judd-271.  Wilkison retained both examples, presumably keeping the first one as potential trade bait.

The pedigrees of Dr. Wilkison’s  two Judd 271’s are as follows:
PCGS PR64+DCAM
Robert Coulton Davis Collection – New York Coin & Stamp 4/1892:111 – S.H. & H. Chapman 4/1897:52 – Virgil Brand (Journal id #17020) – Horace Brand – Dr. Hewitt Judd, traded as part of a massive swap with Dr. Wilkison in 1962 – Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection, whose collection was sold intact in 9/1973 – Paramount International Coin Corporation, sold privately on 4/9/1976 – A-Mark – Ed Trompeter Collection – Southern Collection – Bob R. Simpson Collection

PCGS PR62CAM
Haseltine 3/1883:11 – Abe Kosoff, sold in the early 1940’s for $4,200 (per Akers) – Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection, whose collection was sold intact in 9/1973 – Paramount International Coin Corporation, sold privately on 4/9/1976 – A-Mark – Kagin’s – Bowers & Merena 8/2009 – Bowers & Merena 8/2010:1385, not sold – Heritage 8/2012:5480, $170,375

470659

1865 $20 Gold Pattern, Judd 452, Pollock 524, Gold, Reeded Edge
PCGS PR65+DCAM 28756937

From the front, Judd 452 looks like any other Proof 1865 Double Eagle but, when flipped over, the reverse reveals the motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” in an oval of 13 stars above the eagle.  Since the motto was not adopted until 1866 on Double Eagles, Judd 452 is referred to as a “transitional” pattern.  However, there is some question as to whether Judd 452 was struck in 1865 or sometime in the 1870’s.

Only two Judd 452’s are known.  One example is in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution, acquired by them in 1892 and off the market (essentially) for eternity.  Dr. Wilkison acquired his out of the 1954 sale of the Farouk Collection.  Curiously, Dr. Wilkison eschewed the both the 1865 $5 Judd 445 and 1865 $10 Judd 449 in the Farouk sale, neither of which has re-appeared on the market since then.  Why would he avoid two semi-unique gold patterns, both of which he needed, when he was such an aggressive collector?

The pedigree of Wilkison’s Judd 452 is as follows:
PCGS PR65+DCAM
William H. Woodin Collection – Waldo C. Newcomer Collection – King Farouk Collection – Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection, whose collection was sold intact in 9/1973 – Paramount International Coin Corporation, sold privately on 4/9/1976 (as part of the intact Wilkison Collection) – A-Mark, 1978 – Bob R. Simpson Collection

38641868 $10 Gold Pattern, Judd 661, Pollock 734, Gold, Reeded Edge
PCGS PR66CAM 31672644

Judd 661 is an extremely rare gold pattern, of which four examples were reportedly struck, and of which four examples are known today.  Dr. Wilkison owned two examples.  Like his Judd 271’s, Dr. Wilkison obtained his first from Abe Kosoff in the early 1940’s (for a reported $5,500) and his second in the mega-trade with Dr. Judd in 1962.

According to David Akers, Judd 661 “is reportedly the last work of James B. Longacre.”  But, why was it made at all?  Was there a hue and cry to replace the enduring Liberty Head design?  A perusal of all the 1868 patterns shows a combination of die trials (most likely made for collectors) and some interesting designs, none of which were adopted.

The pedigrees of Dr. Wilkison’s Judd 661’s are as follows:
PCGS PR66CAM
Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection – Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection, whose collection was sold intact in 9/1973 – Paramount International Coin Corporation, sold privately on 4/9/1976 – A-Mark – Bob R. Simpson Collection

NGC PR65UCAM
F.C.C. Boyd Collection – Dr. J. Hewitt Judd Collection – Illustrated History of U.S. Coinage (Abe Kosoff, 1962):354 – Dr. John E. Wilkison Collection, whose collection was sold intact in 9/1973 – Paramount International Coin Corporation, sold privately on 4/9/1976 – A-Mark – Paramount “Auction ’84” 7/1984:528, $39,600 – Auction ’87:332 – Auction ’88:415 – Superior “Auction ’90” 8/1990:1463, $110,000 – Jones Beach Collection – Heritage 1/2007:1370, $218,500

Next installment: The 1872 Amazonian Gold Patterns!

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